Challenge Fourteen: TheShahrazad and Vunderkind

by Vunderkind


** A collabo, and my second with this awesome chicklet. Read up, friends (//_\\) **

Masterminds: TheShahrazad and ThatVunderkind

Domains: Word’s World and A.g(r)eek

______________________________________________________________________________________________

THE FIRST MAGICIAN

Shade (@TheShahrazad)

It’s 2051. The time machine has finally been invented. Only 6 people know about it. These six people have been sworn to secrecy. They know the importance of keeping this secret. If it is let out, it could mean the end of humanity as we know it.

Science has gone far beyond the boundaries of what man could have imagined 30 years before. It would be awe-inspiring to a person waking up from a coma after 30 years, hypothetically speaking. There is now an immediate solution for that. Medicine is so advanced now, they can get a man out of a coma within minutes.

The average life expectancy of the wealthy – for it is still only the wealthy that can afford good health – is 105 years.  Hell, the science of today is awe-inspiring to even the people that have grown with it.

With science growing in leaps and bounds, a lot of the old things are growing dormant. Science has replaced most things, even humans.

Science has even overpowered religion. Most things that had remained a mystery to the science-man had been discovered, and most things about the world could be explained.

Wars had become more frightful, as countries were being wiped off the map. A country could make a nuclear weapon the size of a soldier ant, and the unsuspecting people would disappear in minutes.

The one thing, however, that science still somehow had not been able to conquer, was magic. Not the street kind; their tricks had long been exposed. True magic. Voodoo and hoodoo and Wicca all of that.

The people who fund science however, do not like the people who believe in religion or magic. This punches a hole in all their theories that they cannot afford. Like in the bible, anybody caught practicing would just… disappear.

The world is unhappy, naturally. They have become redundant, unimportant. The simplest functions, bots will perform for them. Wars break out every other day, and I fear the world truly is about to come to an end. This, I cannot let happen.

That is my reason for building the time machine.

Science is really advanced now, but it can never be advanced enough to successfully create a time machine. Many scientists have tried. They all failed.

The only reason I succeeded in building the time machine, is because I had help. Help from the other side. Let me now state the other five people involved in this project.

There is me, Sally Granger, the brain behind the operation and the lead engineer. I’m also funding the project.
Thomas Lloyd, architect.
Gorge Lopez, engineer.
Mike Simoneaux, hoodoo priest.
Lori DeBlanc, voodoo priestess.
Tami Rees, assistant.

It has been a hard 5 years going, but we finally did it. If anyone had found out what we were doing, Mike and Lori would have disappeared. And the rest of us would be in a lot of trouble as well.

There are a lot of people that would give anything to have their hands on this time machine. But if any of us succumbed to the pressure, we would be dooming humanity.

Our mission; kill Teddy McGowan.

Teddy McGowan was in 2021 a college kid who would turn the science world upside-down and make the advancements possible. We have to go further back than that and kill him. It will be hard to do, but it will be for the greater good. The world will be happier.

I watch Mike and Lori casting the final spells, using unmentionable things, and then I go to get ready. There’s not a moment to spare.

The Class Teacher (@oVunderkind)

It is 2021.

Teddy McGowan is in his basement. He calls it a lab, but it really is a basement. He is crouched over his books, paying no attention to the drip drip of water or to the rats squeaking around him.

His breathing is ragged, labored even, like he is about to have an asthmatic attack.

Still he scans the book feverishly. The key – it is in the books. Einstein, Bohr, Edison, Faraday, Newton – they had all been approaching the one problem from different angles.

He – Teddy McGowan – he had the hindsight, and the foresight. He had the keys and the tools to fuse all the greatest minds together.

He could seal the vacuum. He had the power.

He coughed, and blinked. It was dark around him. Paying no mind, he switched on his dying torchlight and continued reading.

He had been reading non-stop for six days.

***

Sally Granger materialized in Thatcher College, and she said a prayer of thanks. She looked around to be sure that the machine had not merely relocated her to another place in 2051, but when she saw the hairstyle on a college girl passing by, she knew it had to be the real deal.

She straightened from her crouch and walked into the school. Finding Teddy McGowan should be easy.

**

Finding Teddy McGowan wasn’t easy. Sally Granger sat in front of the dean, impatiently explaining that she needed to see him. I am a friend of the family.

The dean was bemused. Nobody had seen Teddy McGowan in a week or so. It was unusual. Teddy McGowan was a straight A student who never missed a day of school. He was freaking out. Sighing, Sally Granger calmed him down and went on her hunt. This prey must not elude me.

***

Tricia tensed when she heard the lady in the funny suit mention Ted’s name. No, I haven’t seen him, she replied. Sally Granger frowned slightly, and left.

They are looking for you Ted. You need to run. Tricia dialed his phone. No connection. She decided to pay him a long put-off visit.

Sally Granger tailed her all the way in an awkward car from the past.

**

Tricia easily found her way to the basement. Teddy was still huddled at the same corner she had last seen him six days ago. He stank. The rats creeped her out.

Teddy. They are coming from you. The people from the future. Still, no answer. She moved to touch him.

I am almost close! Don’t tamper with my work! Tricia was frightened. Ted never yelled at her. He used to call her Tricia, No Trivia. She wanted to cry, but she was scared for his life.

She tugged at his arm. He smacked her away. The glare from her phone illuminated his face briefly, and her heart sank. Teddy was a shell.

Sunken, reddened eyes. Sallow cheeks. Slobber. Beard stubble.

She cried.

The door imploded, and Sally Granger tumbled in, SWAT style.

Freeze, she said. Freeze, and she was surprised to hear the bite her words had. She knew that instant that she was going to kill Teddy McGowan if he didn’t co-operate.

Tricia shrieked. The rats squeaked. Teddy McGowan scowled.

I have come to stop you, Sally barked. Stop your crimes.

Teddy wheezed and coughed. I am not the problem. I am the answer to everything.

Sally yelled for him to shut up. Shut up. I have read about how you brainwashed an entire science station to try out your ideas. I will not have you prying into my mind, however you do it. Just shut up.

Teddy smiled, and his hollow cheeks split to reveal plaque-ridden teeth. Would you like me to show you my technique?

Sally’s mind’s eye began to play visions of the future, but it wasn’t the future she had left behind. In this one, there was peace. Health. Food. The future was bursting with life.

And Sally suddenly knew. Teddy McGowan had gotten into her head. He was trying to lure her to his side with his creepy visions.

Quick and decisive, she shot. Twice. The first shot halved Teddy’s massive head. The second repeated the effect on his stomach.

Tricia shrieked forever.

I am sorry, Sally Granger was saying. It was imperative that I do so. He single-handedly ruined the future I come from. And it gets worse in my own future.

Tricia wiped her nose. How do you know it gets worse in your future?

Sally sighed. Magicians. They see the future, but cannot change it. You wouldn’t understand. Magic didn’t come into play until 2030, I believe.

Tricia shook her head. You are the one who doesn’t understand. Your magicians, where do you think they come from? Think on it for a second. Your time machine – no one could have fashioned it without help from science and magic.

Sally turned around. How did you –

Tricia hushed her. Your magicians, they see the future. Teddy saw the future too. Think on it. In 30 years, Science achieved what it couldn’t in millennia. What do you think caused this?

Sally smirked. You tell me.

Tricia shook her head again. The fusion of science and magic. You are not the first person to have the brilliant idea of fusing magic and science.

Teddy was a magician. And he was going to restore balance to a world plagued by science in all its errors.

Sally sighed. What are you saying?

Even before Tricia completed her sentence, Sally knew. Teddy is the First Magician. The one who would make other magicians, quite like your friends in the future who helped you with the time machine.

But you killed him.

Now science will grind to a halt. Magic, too. The future Teddy McGowan showed you will never come to fruition.

Sally protested. In my past – his present, Teddy McGowan harnessed the laws of physics, and brainwashed scientists into using it for his evil ends.

Tricia: No. In this present, where you kill Ted, another scientist chances upon Ted’s discovery and does all that. He acknowledges Ted McGowan in his work, and that is why your present attributes the evils to him.

Sally jabbed frantically at her timepiece – the device which was supposed to bring her back to the future.

Tricia sobbed. Don’t you get it? With Ted’s death – The First Magician’s death – your friends, the magicians are mere humans and therefore it is impossible to make your time machine. In fact, you no longer exist in that future.

Sally fell to the ground. She had fainted.

Tricia wailed.

**

It’s 2051.

Mike Simoneaux sighed at his reflection in the mirror. His hair was getting white at the crown. He turned around to see his wife stretching a cup of coffee at him.

“You are running late,” she said.

“I don’t wanna go.”

“But you must.”

“I know.” He sighed.

She kissed him. “You are a strong man. You can.”

“I am just an ordinary man, that is the problem.”

“Not to me, you’re not. Go out there and kick ass.” And she steered him out of the house.

At the door, she whispered, “I love you Mike.”

He sighed. He wasn’t cut out to be a sales manager. The job was boring and the expectations were impossible. The pay was crap, too.

But he still said the words.

“I love you too, Lori.”

Advertisements